Packages on sale now, individual tickets on sale July 1st.

Nashville-based songwriter Gabe Lee is becoming increasingly known for his ability to detail the intricacies of everyday life, the small distinctions that leave some on the fringe and others in the mainstream, and the particulars that stick around long after a lover leaves. His second album in as many years, Honky Tonk Hell (2020), finds Gabe diving deeper into themes that aren’t far from his own life — exactly what it meant to grow up in Nashville and what it means to still be a songwriter there, how it feels to be settling into adulthood and the monotony and occasional heartbreak it can contain, as well as the pieces of a younger time that didn’t quite work out as expected. But, the way he tells these stories — these common pieces of experiences — is through narratives of men on the run, lovers who leave and vivid imagery, inspired by everything from Biblical stories to forgotten small towns and the people who inhabit them. One of just a few songwriters of Asian descent in Nashville’s music scene, Gabe’s parents immigrated from Taiwan in the early ‘80s to pursue master’s degrees at the University of Arizona. They followed a job to Nashville, where he was raised. His mother, a professional and classically-trained pianist, was an integral force in Gabe’s musical education. keep making music and playing 200+ shows a year.

“Somewhere in trying to figure out how to craft a good song, I figured out how not to just write a pile of sad songs,” Nate Fredrick says about his new album, Different Shade of Blue. “It’s not that my situation is different or even better, but I’ve found a different way to perceive my personal circumstances.” That level of introspection is clear throughout Fredrick’s debut album, 11 tracks recorded at Nashville’s Farmland Studios with producer David Dorn. The collection sounds as familiar as what you might hear on a friend’s back porch, but Fredrick’s lyrics are bound to get stuck in your head as he works through his relationship to both himself and his home—where he’s from as well as Nashville, where he moved in 2015. A native Missourian, Nate learned to play guitar after his dad brought one home—that he never learned to play—when Nate was 12. But he didn’t start writing songs until a decade later. “A friend and I were running from the police one night, and I accidentally fell off a cliff,” Nate says. “During the two-year recovery process, I started actually making music instead of just playing music. The first show I ever had, I played with my jaw wired shut.” His bluesy Americana style is the result of influences such as Guy Clark, Creedence Clearwater Revival and Van Morrison, to name a few. Fredrick wrote more than 100 songs in the two years after he moved to Music City.